Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Art shows


Junior - completed
Graphite 9 x 12 on Bristol Smooth
Copyright Jeanette Jobson


Why is there always a flurry before a show? I must get complacent and figure I have lots of time, then suddenly realize that the deadline is looming and panic sets in.

With panic, mistakes happen and everything seems to go wrong as I rush. I had the piece framed then decided at the last moment that I wanted it in a larger frame. I have a few spare frames so I chose a larger one and one by one the framing pins broke. Then I got the drawing taped in and realized it was crooked. Start again.

More framing pins break.

Swearing starts in earnest.

I finally got the drawing and the frame to cooperate, cleaned the glass, carefully pushed in the remaining framing pins and sealed the back of the finished piece. I decided I'd better wire it just in case. I didn't know how it was being hung on the other end, so figured I'd be on the safe side and cover all eventualities. Of course the posts wouldn't go into the frame would they? Nooooooo. I searched all over the house looking for my dremel drill, but its in the barn. Across the wet yard. In the pitch dark. I went on to plan B.

This is where I knew that high school math would eventually serve me well. A compass point! I rummaged around in the jar behind the kettle and came up with one, applied pressure to the frame and sure enough, it worked beautifully. Its probably the only useful thing that ever came out of my high school math.

This piece is going to Corner Brook, which is an 8 hour drive from here, so next I needed to wrap the picture so it wouldn't have chipped corners or broken glass by the time it arrived. Did I remember to buy bubble wrap on the way home? Nooooooooooooooo. Its 10pm by now and the stores are very shut. Plan B comes into action - or as I call it, recycling. More cupboards opened and searched, more swearing. Finally I found some bubble wrap from another package that didn't have all the bubbles popped (its such a satisfying stress reliever, popping those little bubbles isn't it?). So after liberal application of bubble wrap, wrapping paper and tape, the piece sits, awaiting delivery tomorrow and then on its way. Its not a pretty package, but it will get there.

Now I'm exhausted. And that was just ONE piece. The next show on October 21 is four pieces.

I'm going to buy bubble wrap tomorrow. And a bottle of whiskey.

5 comments:

Terry Banderas said...

I enjoyed your post on getting ready for an exhibit. I have learned to never think I have enough time. Once the art is done the prep for the framing, paperwork and all other exhibit details can be a true pain. Then when I think I am done I notice a speck within the completed piece. Whisky or gin and tonics help ease the pain.

Jeanette said...

Thanks for the sympathy Terry. Yes, the art is the easy part it seems, the rest seems to cause the stress. However, I've just dropped off the piece so can breathe again - til the next one. :)

Billie Crain said...

and here i thought i was the last of the redhot procrastinators. makes life interesting to wait until zero hour to get things completed, doesn't it? then is when Murphy's Law always kicks in. LOL! i'm glad this had a happy ending.:-)

Katherine said...

I'm convinced that the reason I don't show more than I do is because I can't cope with the stress levels involved in all that final finishing off.

I'm exactly the same - think I have loads of time and then everything goes wrong.

My best one this year was setting up and printing all the labels for each one to go on the back (each has a mini-pic of the work) and then finding that I'd completely forgotten to put my name on!

Over here the post offices all seem to have geared themselves up with packing material for e-bayers. I'm trying to work out when they might realise that they need to add in those packing boxes for artwork too!

Laurel Neustadter said...

It seems we always have bubble wrap around the house from incoming packages ... until we actually need some, of course. Junior is a beautiful drawing.