Sunday, June 27, 2010

Tangle of Capelin - Part II


I created, or started creating, a painting of capelin using a batik technique on masa paper - A Tangle of Capelin. This was done as a demo of the batik process and gives the basics to achieve the fractured surface of the masa and proves to be one of the most commonly visited page on my blog - along with gummy bears and laptop sleeves! This piece had been sitting on my drawing table waiting to be completed, so today was as good a day as any to do so.

I also wanted to try out some iridescent colours that I had ordered that I hoped would give a subtle sheen to fish skin.  These are Daniel Smith watercolours and they work beautifully over a darker surface, giving a slight reflective quality dependent on the viewers angle and work well for these fish. You can see the effect of a wash of iridescent gold over the gill plate of this fish.


I have intensified the colours in the piece with more layers of turquoise and phalo blue with touches of quinacridone red to and burnt orange (my new favourite) to balance and complement the overall blues.  This piece of masa is mounted on an 11x 15 sheet of 140lb watercolour paper.  The washes buckle it a little, but some pressing under weights should take care of that.  I should have stretched the paper prior to painting but it was a demo at the time and I didn't think it would go further.  Isn't that always the way??

So a little more definition of the fins for a couple of these fish then it complete.  I have a couple of commissions to work on this week, interspersed with more fish.

9 comments:

Billie Crain said...

This painting really packs a punch. The changes you've made are right on the money. Good job photographing the iridescent paint. That's hard to do.

Jeanette said...

Thanks Billie. I love the blues and the touch of orange that works well against it. I'm happy with how this has turned out.

the iridescent paint is something new to me. Its subtlety works well for fish.

Julie Broom said...

Exceptional, Jeanette. I'm really impressed with how you've used iridescent paint in this piece. As you said it's subtle enough to compliment the shimmer of fish. You've just reminded me that I have some tarnished metal leaf that I haven't made use of yet ...hmmm .... :-)

vivien said...

really lovely - you are going to have such a fabulous lot of work for an exhibition at the end of this project.

RHCarpenter said...

This irridescent paint was made for this subject! Looks wonderful. I am in awe of your work - taking something that wouldn't be considered noteworthy at all and making it a beautiful work of art. Great colors, good values, visual punch!

Jeanette said...

Julie, I used a little silver leaf on this too that is visible in this image, but reflects depending on the viewpoint.

Thanks Vivien, I haven't really started a lot on the gyotaku project yet as I'm still waiting for some supplies to come in. But I will have similar pieces to this at the end too.

Rhonda, I always find it amazing how the most simple things can become visually appealing given the right light and colours.

These fish and a touch of iridescence works well. Thanks for your comments.

Jan said...

I can see why the orange is your new favorite color - the whole painting just pops. You've gotten everything balanced perfectly and the iridescence is the perfect finishing touch.

Lisa M Griffin said...

love this... what an amazing technique and extremely interesting composition.

artbyakiko said...

Fascinating work!! I love it. As a child, I have tried batik on fabric, but don't know how you do this on paper. Love to know that!