Sunday, February 03, 2019

Puffins


Mind Your Head
12" x 12"
oil on cradled wood panel
Available for purchase online  Click here for details

Puffins are the Atlantic version of parrots.  Colourful, stocky and low flying, they seek shelter and homes on outcropping on the edge of land or on islands just offshore.  And in Newfoundland, we are lucky enough to have them close by and see them from land or on a boat just off shore.  At present, about 60 percent of the North American population breeds on four islands in Witless Bay off the east coast of the island of Newfoundland

There seems to be a universal appeal for these birds, especially in their breeding season when their beaks are brightly coloured.  After the breeding season, the beaks change to a dull grey, making them almost look like an entirely different bird.

They aren't elegant and if you've watched them take off and land you'd see their lack of grace as they crash into other birds as they land or fall into the sea when taking off.

5 comments:

Jo Castillo said...

This is a great painting and story. We loved seeing the puffins when we were in Nova Scotia. I liked the no smoking signs that said No Puffin with the red line through it. Thanks for the memories.

Jeanette Jobson said...

They are the cutest little birds. During breeding season near the southern shore, you find baby puffins on the road and in gardens. They are attracted by street and porch lights, thinking they are the moon. There is a volunteer puffin rescue program to gather them up at night and taken them back to the ocean in the morning.

I'm glad you could experience them first hand in Nova Scotia.

Jennifer Rose Phillip said...

I love puffins but have yet to see them in the wild. there are a few breeding colonies around here but not easy for me to get to :/ one day maybe though :)

Jeanette Jobson said...

Yeah puffins do tend to be in the most awkward spots to get to, don't they? Just like gannets. There is one place here on the island where you can see them from land and not too hard to get to. Other spots it involves getting in a boat and heading to small islands offshore. That has its benefit too as you get to see whales at the same time.

RH Carpenter said...

Funny little birds and those bright beaks in breeding season make you want to just say, WOW. Love how you've captured the auk-wardness of these (sorry, couldn't resist the pun! ha ha).